click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
MSNBCW 12
MSNBC 8
CNNW 5
CNN 4
CNBC 1
FBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king ske.
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
gave, the civil rights speech of a generation that people look at that speech as, it will be interesting to see what comes next. great to see you. safe travels back today. thanks for being here. >>> all of us, as vital as the one light we move through, the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day, equations to solve, history to question or atoms imagined. the i have a dream we all keep dreaming. or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won't explain the empty desks of 20 children marked absent today and forever. >> it was a stirring, intimate and modern tribute to america in verse both uplifting and heartbreaking and historic in its own right. joining me is the man who wrote the poem exclusively, richard blanco, inaugural poet. correct myth from legend here. we understand there were three poems that you had penned for this and the white house picked this one. however, it wasn't your favorite. so explain the other two poems and why one was top on the list as opposed to this one. >> well, i think it was part of the challenge of writing the occasional po
the right to vote, and wrong about civil rights, wrong about vietnam, wrong about weapons of mass destruction in iraq. after being wrong about that, and that is just the tip, after being wrong about that, conservatives would have some self doubt about some things. but hard headedness is what makes them conservatives. it is what makes bill o'reilly bill o'reilly. bill o'reilly and his reaction to the inaugural address and his criticism of the inaugural address is in the rewrite tonight. that is coming up. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. . >>> the court said in a 7 to 2 decision that in the first three months of pregnancy, only the woman and her physician may decide whether or not she may have an abortion. >> it me
survive half slave and half free. >> casting himself in the mold of the great civil rights leader, vowed action on a series of issues from climate change to immigration reform and became the first president to use the word "gay" in the address. >> our gurn noi are not complete until wives, daughters, can earn a wage equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brother and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> he offered a bigger defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit, but we reject the belief america has to choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started it with a prayer service at st. johns church before departing the white house for one of the longest motorcades known to man for the ride to the capitol. ♪ oh beautiful >> a star-studded affair where else will paul ryan mingle with beyonce who belted out the national anthem. when the
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
rights. take for example the civil war when men fled behind so-called enemy lines to the north, they inserted their humanity with the demand they be allowed to join the union army and fight against the confederacy. and black soldiers in world war i came home to find themselves the targets of lynchings and beatings. why? because they were wearing their uniforms in public. but it was the very fact of their service that w.e.b. du bois believed bound them to the citizenship. but with those citizens at home, w.e.b. du bois wrote, this is the country to which we soldiers of democracy return and this is the fatherland for which we fought, but it is our fatherland. it was right for us to fight. the faults of our country are our faults. make way for democracy, and we saved it in france, and by the great jehovah, we will save nit the united states of america or know the reason why. but it wasn't until world war ii that du bois's imperative would become fully realized, because afric african-american like the tuskegee airmen and the first african-american nurses who j n joined the black n
next guest, henry marsh at the forefront of the civil rights battle. he handled more than 50 school desegregation cases and innovated strategies to battle employment discrimination, which is what makes the action of his conservative colleagues in the general assembly worthy of condemnation. when mr. marsh went to washington, d.c. last week on martin luther king day to witness president obama's second inauguration, republicans in the state senate used his absence to gerrymander the commonwealth map. joining me from richmond is virginia state senator, henry marsh. nice to have you mr. marsh. >> good morning. >> first i want to say thank you for joining us. i understand how had to go to the early services at church this morning to make time to be here. i greatly appreciate that. >> i didn't want to miss church. the lord made all this happen. >> in fact, let me ask you in part about how angry you are about how your absence has made possible this new map. >> actually, i'm ashamed and embarrassed for my state. somebody's absent almost two or three days a week. never was there an attempt t
, daughter of the civil rights leader joins us today. your father's personal bible is used in the swearing in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress t
is obviously history. >> there is a strong theme of civil rights. >> america's possibilities are limitless. it is now our generation's task to carry on. >> this speech was about an action plan. >> we cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or treat name-calling as debate. we must act. >> things will get back to what we see as normal. >> today is a day to celebrate the democracy. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment. and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. >> for the first time in recent history, today a giant event in washington ran a few minutes early. and ten minutes before noon, chief justice john roberts administered the oath of office to the president, and he delivered the second inaugural address which lasted just over 18 minutes. >> for our journeys are not complete until our wives and mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal, as we
. and a lot of journalists who were too young to cover the civil rights stories of the 60's, they weren't going to miss out on helping to shape history twice. so, they covered him the way they covered him. you know, by slobbering all over him. other historic figure. she could be the first woman president of the united states. this week, after those hearings, the media began slobbering in urgent. it will continue ratchet up when she announces she is running as president of the united states. you know what, bill? you it doesn't matter what you think about this. it doesn't matter what i think about. this it doesn't matter what krauthammer thinks about it. it doesn't matter what brit hume thinks about it. it doesn't matter what anybody thinks about it. because these people, these journalists were born without the embarrassment. nothing embarrasses them about how they behave. >> do you think that brian williams and and the rest of them, diane sawyer, martha raddatz, do you think that they know how they sounded while introducing a very important story, secretary of state's testimony in front
filibuster is part of the tradition. how is that the -- >> part of the tradition of blocking civil rights legislation, right? it's not like -- it was a fairly effective method of blocking all sorts of legislation. >> that's true. >> i mean, at the same time, look, the republicans what they wanted most and they have claimed that the reason they filibuster everything is that harry reid hasn't allowed them to offer amendments. to your point about filling the amendment tree. they got what they wanted most. now harry reid will not be able to prevent them from offering amendments. he will have to let both sides offer two amendments medical record to move a bill past the first filibuster, and this isn't the filibuster. this is just to begin debate on an item. i mean, i think republicans ms instance got exactly the thing they wanted most. i'm not sure what democrats got. i agree with keeping the filibuster itself because democrats may need is one day, but i think more reform than this was warranted. >> we have no idea where 20141 going to happen. there are a lot of vulnerable democrats that will
civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit filed to try and stop the city. hazel dukes is the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> reporter: it's about? >> economic disparity. and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big corporate people, again, have their own way. >> reporter: convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp, along with the hispanic federation, argue that small and minority-owned businesses will feel is a disproportionate impact. then, there's the obesity epidemic. non-hispanic blacks, according to the cdc, have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp followed a legal brief in support of beverage companies, saying, to tackle the public health crisis of obesity, it's developed a holistic, educational program called project help. the funding for that project, according to the naacp's website, is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. duke says the new york chapte
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
creed. >> gretchen: as the rest rand and civil rights leader his words transformed a nation, after nearly 50 years of delivering his most famous speech, what would dr. king think about how we're handling race relations and other issues today. let's ask somebody who would know, alveda king is the niece of dr. martin luther king. and they've written a new book, mar lute king, jr., a king family tribute. what a beautiful book. >> good morning, and thank you so much. all of our family members have contributed to that book, remembering the martin luther king, jr. we knew and loved. and so, it's wonderful that you would even ask what would he be doing today. and he'd be doing the same thing that he was doing then. you know, he spoke with billy graham in madison square garden in his lifetime and he preached the bible and today the bible is front and center again, his bible and president lincoln's bible. so you have 150 years of the emancipation proclamation and 50 years of the dream and they're represented by those two bibles today. >> gretchen: it's so unbelievable it will be the bible f
mom to my right is mahassan and my mom to the right is my birth mother, and basically i support civil unions. nobody can't ever tell me that i can't have two mothers because i really do. >> this probably would never have happened 10 or 15 years ago, david zirin. you know that. why is it now that athletes are taking more political issues? >> on this issue in particular it's a great example because to me it's the whole real world sports world dynamic and yes, it's definitely true, the real world over here and the sports world over here, but this moat that separates the two, people are starting to build bridges and in the last five years there's been a national movement state by state for lbgt rights and for marriage equality. and athletes, as one athlete said to me, i quote him in the book. he said, look, it's not like we live on planet jock and only come down here to play games and also not like we watch our own msnbc. you know, that's just for athletes. you know, we're part of this world, too, and when you have more and more athletes who have connections to the lbgt community and a mo
civilizations which sprung up on these shores. we're in sardinia right now, an island off the coast of italy, and the fishermen here go after the bluefin much the same way their ancestors did during the days of the roman empire. fishermen from the village of carloforte fix nets to the ocean floor, trapping the migrating bluefin in giant chambers. we went out with divers to check on their trap. we had no idea what to expect. floating walls of nets stretching six stories high. there's no escape here for these juggernauts who can cross the atlantic at 70 miles an hour. the only sound: the bubbles from the oxygen tanks. then a truly exceptional sight. seeing tuna on a sushi plate is one thing. seeing the king of sushi down here is something else entirely. within a few hours, the tuna and the fishermen would be face-to-face, locked in an ancient ritual called the mattanza, which means, literally, "the slaughter." the mattanza begins with a small armada. old boats with rusty hulls are towed out and hauled into position surrounding the nets. [people yelling] over the course of the next two hours, t
. >> and so the killing just continues on the ground indefinitely, right? >> alas, and do we send in the marines or whatever we send in or we bomb them. >> and we get in the middle of a civil war and, of course, ends badly. and the region erupts. the russians. it seems to me that it's not in the russians' best interests in the long run to continue standing beside a tyrant who seems to me, if the past is prologue, cannot survive this in the long run. >> i think you're right in terms of the interests. but there is a peculiar aspect, namely putin's personality and personal obsessions. this is a man driven by nostalgia and resentment. he literally hates the fact that the soviet empire collapsed. he wants to recreate it. and he may be calculating that if we get bogged down in iran and in the region, he'll have an opening to crack down on something very important to europe and to us, georgia and as asser b azerbaijan. >> talking about the president needing more engagement, getting into areas where he can have a real impact, what does that look like, do you think, in this second term? wh
footsie games. you can't have it both ways. >> what is the right thing? >> you have to come up with a settlement. colorado law won't tell a catholic institution you can't settle. what they can't do is to hide under the cloak of civil law, and say i'm sorry, we're still pro life, but you know what? you're not really a person when you are a fetus, because we're just hiding under colorado civil law. if that's the case, then they made a mockery of catholic teaching and they should be stripped of their catholicism. >> you look at hospitals, it kind of contradicts that. when you look at the law, when it's contraception, that's one thing. but this is the law, and so i find this one a conundrum. >> the catholic church is always fighting laws. we're fighting against governor cuomo who wants to bring in nonphysicians to treat women who want abortions. the catholic church takes its dictates from natural law. as far as i'm concerned, it's not as difficult as some people may want to make it out to be not a whole lot of wiggle room if you are truly catholic. >> a catholic hospital has been s
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)